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27 Nov
2019

52399 – Your TaskWrite a reflective essay after:1. Use the… | NO PLAGIARISM

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Your TaskWrite a reflective essay after:1. Use the Johari Window to discuss the results2. Using the Johari Window model for self-awareness, critically analyse your own findings and those of your associates to reflect on what you have learned about yourself. Write a 1,500-word reflective essay based on the assessment results you have gathered. Discuss key areas of strengths and areas for improvement. In particular, review major differences between your self- assessment and those that you received from your chosen two associates.3. In addition to an introduction (approx.200 words) and conclusion (approx. 200 words)., the reflective essay should comprise three main sections:In Part 1, critically compare your results with those of the two people who evaluated you. In your analysis, use the four quadrants of the Johari W indow; i.e. Open, Blind, Hidden, Unknown (approx. 400 words).In Part 2, analyse your strengths and weaknesses based on your own survey results (approx. 300 words).In Part 3, reflect on what competencies you would like to develop in order to function well as a global citizen. Provide practical examples with the assumption you work in a culturally diverse global organisation (approx. 400 words).Your reflective essay should include:• Integration of these reflections with theoretical concepts.• A reflective essay can be entirely written in the first person.• A brief discussion of identified strengths and areas for development, presenting your own results, your associates’ results, and a discussion of the patterns, similarities/differences and trends you discover.• Evidence of integration of feedback received from your associates, as well as consideration of your own past experiences and feedback from other sources you have received in years gone by.• A clear conclusion reflecting on how your new insights may assist you with a potential career in a culturally diverse organisation.• A reference list (over 10 sources)Further guidance:• This paper requires a significant amount of analysis and personal reflection.This means that you should consider the Johari W indow model by breaking down its four parts and reflecting on how the various quadrants provide a deeper understanding of yourself.Criteria F (Fail) 0%-49 % P (Pass) 50%64% CR (Credit) 65%-74 % D (Distinction) 75% – 84% HD (High Distinction) 85%-100% MarkAssessment Content (Subject specific) OUT OF 24 MARKSProvided evidence of completed surve ys (of self-evaluation and two associates’ evaluations) Attached evidence of required surveys of yours as well as those of two other chosen associates (colleagues, friends or family).Marks will be deducted proportionally for missing or partially completed surveys. /6Critical review of assessment of self- integrating feedback received from associates No evaluation and reflection of the differences in assessment results (own personal assessment vs. feedback received). Fair evaluation and reflection of the differences in assessment results (own personal assessment vs. feedback received) Good evaluation and reflection of the differences in assessment results (own personal assessment vs. feedback received). Very good critical evaluation and reflection of the differences in assessment results (own personal assessment vs. feedback received). Excellent critical evaluation and reflection of the differences in assessment results (own personal assessment vs. feedback received) /8Theory integration No effort to integrate concepts and theories in support of discussion and reflection. Little effort to integrate concepts and theories in support of discussion and reflection. Good use of the concepts and theories in support of discussion and reflection. Very good use of the concepts and theories in support of discussion and reflection. Excellent use of the concepts and theories in support of discussion and reflection. /5Reflection on insights gained for a potential career in a culturally diverse global organisation No reflection on insights for a potential career in a culturally diverse global organisation. Superficial reflection on insights for a potential career in a culturally diverse global organisation. Good reflection on insights for a potential career in a culturally diverse global organisation. Very good reflection on insights for a potential career in a culturally diverse global organisation. Very thorough reflection on insights for a potential career in a culturally diverse global organisation. /5My own test:First test:Score InterpretationScore Comment15-34 You need to work on your emotional intelligence. You may find that you feel overwhelmed by your emotions, especially in stressful situations; or, you may avoid conflict because you think that you’ll find it distressing.It’s likely, too, that you find it hard to calm down after you’ve felt upset, and you may struggle to build strong working relationships.Don’t worry – there are plenty of ways that you can build emotional intelligence, starting now. Read our tips below to find out more.35-55 Your emotional intelligence level is… OK.You probably have good relationships with some of your colleagues, but others may be more difficult to work with.The good news is that you have a great opportunity to improve your working relationships significantly. Read more below to boost your EI still further.56-75 Great! You’re an emotionally intelligent person. You have great relationships, and you probably find that people approach you for advice.However, when so many people admire your people skills, it’s easy to lose sight of your own needs. Read our tips below to find out how you can continue to build your EI.Researchers have found that emotionally intelligent people often have great leadership potential. Realize this potential by seeking opportunities to improve even further.Characteristics of Emotional IntelligencePsychologist Daniel Goleman identified five elements that make up emotional intelligence. These are:1. Self-awareness.2. Self-regulation.3. Motivation.4. Empathy.5. Social skills.Terms reproduced by permission of Bloomsbury Press.Let’s look at how you can develop good skills in each area.Self-Awareness(Questions 1, 8, 11)Your score is 12 out of 15In his 1995 book -Emotional Intelligence: Why it can Matter More Than IQ,- Goleman explained that people with high self-awareness are -aware of their moods as they are having them.-To increase self-awareness , learn about mindfulness . This involves focusing on the present moment – including how you’re feeling. And keep a journal in which you write about and analyze the emotional situations you experience from day to day.You also need to understand your strengths and weaknesses to build self-awareness. Do a personal SWOT analysis , and ask for feedback from your boss, friends, and trusted colleagues to find out how you can improve further.Self-Regulation(Questions 2, 4, 7)Your score is 10 out of 15Self-regulation is about staying in control. To develop your skills in this area, learn how to manage your emotions effectively.If you often get angry , note what triggers this feeling, and think about why this happens. Use techniques such as deep breathing to calm yourself down, and give yourself time to pause before you respond to emails or requests, so that you don’t say something that you’ll later regret. (See our article on anger management to learn more about this.)You may also be affected by other negative feelings and emotions, such as anxiety and stress . So, do what you can to manage these feelings effectively.Accountability is another important element of self-regulation. Take responsibility for your actions and behaviors, and make sure that these align with your values .Motivation(Questions 6, 10, 12)Your score is 12 out of 15Self-motivation is strongly affected by your emotions. When you’re distracted by your emotions, you may find it hard to see tasks through.Boost your motivation levels by developing self-discipline , and by looking for and celebrating small wins – simple jobs that, when you’ve completed them, give you a sense of achievement.Also, set yourself longer-term goals . When you decide what you want to achieve, you’ll focus on what really matters to you. This can be highly motivating, especially when you connect personal goals with career-related ones.If you’re still struggling to get motivated in your current role, take some time to rediscover your purpose .Empathy(Questions 3, 13, 15)Your score is 14 out of 15Empathy is the ability to recognize other people’s emotions and understand their perspectives. Goleman calls this aspect of EI -the fundamental people skill.-To develop empathy , start by simply thinking about other people’s viewpoints. Imagine how they may be feeling, and use active listening skills to understand them fully when they express their emotions to you.Try not to interrupt or talk about your own feelings during the conversation. Look at their body language , too: it can tell you a lot about their emotions. If you watch and listen to others, you’ll quickly become attuned to how they feel. (The Perceptual Positions technique can give you a particularly sharp insight into what other people may be thinking and feeling.)Tip:If you’re a leader, read our article -What’s Empathy Got to do With it?- for tips on using empathy in leadership.Social Skills(Questions 5, 9, 14)Your score is 4 out of 15Even if you’re not a natural -people person,- it is possible to develop better social skills.Start by taking our quiz to see which communication skills you need to improve on. Then, find out how you can develop trust and rapport with people – this is an essential part of building good working relationships .Don’t shy away from negative situations, either. Learn how to deal with conflict and other difficult situations effectively.If you’re uncomfortable with social situations, work on building self-confidence . Start slowly, but then look for opportunities to practice your skills with bigger groups. For example, you could offer to attend conferences on behalf of your team.Key PointsDeveloping high emotional intelligence (or EI) is incredibly important for a successful career. When we have high levels of emotional intelligence, we’re able to build strong working relationships and manage difficult situations more effectively.Influential psychologist Daniel Goleman developed a framework of five elements that define emotional intelligence:1. Self-awareness.2. Self-regulation.3. Motivation.4. Empathy.5. Social skills.Even if you already have many of the elements of emotional intelligence, it’s important to look for opportunities to build it further. This will increase your leadership potential, and improve the quality of your relationships.(For more detail, see our full emotional intelligence article and video and take a look at our infographic, below. Mind Tools Premium Club members and corporate users can also access our exclusive Expert Interview podcast with Daniel Goleman, here .)InfographicClick on the image below to see Goleman’s theory represented in an infographic:This site teaches you the skills you need for a happy and successful career; and this is just one of many tools and resources that you’ll find here at Mind Tools. Subscribe to our free newsletter, or join the Mind Tools Club and really supercharge your career!Add this article to My Learning PlanSecond testFrom the first my friend:Second testFrom the second friend:Frist testSecond test

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