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19 Nov
2020

Answer these questions thoroughly by quoting some lines from the text to support your…

Category:ACADEMICIAN

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Answer these questions thoroughly by quoting some lines from the text to support your point. 1. Between Creon and Antigone, who qualifies more as Aristotelian tragic hero? Discuss and support your stand. 2. Discuss the issues raised by Haemon against Creon concerning youth, gender, intelligence, rulers and subjects. This is the reading material: https://www.fusd1.org/cms/lib03/AZ01001113/Centricity/Domain/1385/Antigone Full Text.pdf?fbclid=IwAR2o7YkTu8w6h8syJGCRv8KY4W93DKllRt_qap3pqMJI7RUf4cBRlNuCzhU
Please help with a effective commentary. The essay is included below. Please help mark commentary in revision and develop a
Please help with a effective commentary. The essay is included below. Please help mark commentary in revision and develop a commentary. ● Include the original and the revision in your document. ● Mark the commentary in your revision. You may tweak your claims or evidence if you feel it is necessary, but the objective of this assignment is to improve your commentary in order to develop a line of reasoning. Sample G [1] When I was nine year sold, my parents celebrated my birthday by taking me to a ropes course. As we waited with our group to climb poles, cross logs, and hang from ropes, I began to get cold feet. I’ve never done this before, I thought. What if I fall and get hurt, or if I get scared and everyone makes fun of me? I decided then and there that I had no intentions of climbing that day. When we reached the front of the line, however, my parents has other plans: I was not able to leave until I climbed at least once. Fighting against my kicking and screaming, I was [ILLEGIBLE]-enlously put in a harness and helmet, and placed at the top of the ladder. “Don’t look down, and have fun!” said the belayer as they let me go. Against my better judgement, I begin to climb. As I went up, though, I stopped feeling the shaking in my legs, and by the top, I was smiling ear to ear. I loved this! And even after I fell off the log on my first step, I practically dragged my parents back in line to climb again. Nowadays, climbing is one of my favorite activities, and I’m confident that if I had not climbed that day on my ninth birthday, if I had not ventured out of my comfort zone into the unknown and frightening, then I may have never climbed at all for the rest of my life. [2] Exploring the unknown is a rewarding, if initially terrifying experience. As someone wants to go off a high dive, or is about to start their first day at a new school, anticipation eats them alive. Nerves replace all reason, they wish they had never done this, and are nostalgic for the known, the comfortable, the past. However, in most cases, the times when people are most nervous about something is right before they actually do it. Once they take the plunge, they realize this unknown experience is not all that bad. Imagination makes things out much worse than they really are, so new experiences can even be relenting. Without taking the plunge into the unknown, people and society can never grow or mature. By staying in the light and comfort of familiarity, they miss every opportunity for experience that life has to offer. Thus, venturing into the unknown is a worthwhile experience for the maturity and growth it can provide. [3] When Christopher Columbus began his voyage to the New World in the late 15th century, he did so on a hunch. He did not know what he would find on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, and many called his ideas surreal. Those who challenged Columbus feared the unknown that lay across the murky expanse of the ocean, choosing instead to stick with what they had and not take any chances. Despite having no knowledge of what lay ahead, Columbus sailed west, and discovered America. Had Columbus caved into the pressure of his critics, had he decided to remain within his European comfort zone, history as we knew it would be forever altered. Against all odds, despite all the risks, Columbus made no voyage, changing the world forever. Columbus’ story is a prime example of the value of venturing into the unknown. Even if there are possible negative repercussions, even if the road ahead is veiled in shadow, exploring new lands and trying new things are huge learning experiences. When someone tries something for the first time, they are bound to make mistakes. Performers may forget song 4 lyrics, or musicians might miss some notes, climbers might fall early. But with each failure, people become more familiar with the unknown. They learn how to recover from mistakes, how to never even make any. Repeat this process of trial and error over and over, and soon enough, the unknown becomes the known, and the worries of venturing into it have been overcome. A wise man once said “You’ll never know until you try.” How did Michael Phelps become an Olympic swimmer? He overcame childhood worries about swimming, overcame worries about being in the spotlight, and thrived. He ventured into various unknowns, learned their layouts, and made them his own. This goes for any person who was ever successful in anything: They tried something new. If someone never has a goal, never tries to learn something new from venturing out into the unknown, they will have no true motivation. And without motivation, life is meaningless. That’s why people having life crises go for something drastic or unique: they are exploring the unknown to find answers. If you cannot find a solution within your comfort zone, you will have to go beyond it to find true happiness. Thus, venture into the unknown can only bring positive effects for those willing to explor
Article:When did Gen Y become Gen Y-Can’t-We-Take-You-Seriously?SARAH HAMPSONPUBLISHED OCTOBER 20, 2012 At every turn in the fashion landscape, they are
Article:When did Gen Y become Gen Y-Can’t-We-Take-You-Seriously?SARAH HAMPSONPUBLISHED OCTOBER 20, 2012 At every turn in the fashion landscape, they are there, laughing, posing, carefree and beautiful.They are cultural icons, simply because they are young, in their luminescent 20s or younger, the time of life we fetishize. We want their skin, their waistline, their hair, their exuberance, their freedom.And yet, the decade of life that the fashion world glamorizes is the one that the culture at large dismisses. It has a dysfunctional relationship with those who are young. We admire their beauty but are suspicious of their intelligence. (Witness the response to Lena Dunham’s $3.6-million book deal a few weeks ago, causing people to question whether the creator of HBO’s Girls is worth it.) We long for (and emulate) their glowing vitality, but we marginalize their contributions. We pay attention when some break through the mainstream cultural-attention barrier, but we’re reluctant to take them seriously.We simply consume them, in one way or another, for our pleasure, our use, our entertainment.I readily admit that I don’t watch The Bachelorette for anything other than perverse pleasure. Do you? But I’m quite sure that the participants aren’t agreeing to appear on the reality show in order for us to snicker at them gleefully in our living rooms over a TV snack of whole-grain chips and a glass of pinot. It’s as if we parade young people into the cultural Colosseum to have them distract us from our workaday lives, to see who will fall, what or who will slay them, who might survive. And we sit by, observing from the stands, unwilling to help much when they flounder. Isn’t that why we’re weirdly fascinated with Lindsay Lohan’s shenanigans?The irony (some might say the tragedy) is that the current generation of twentysomethings, the Millennials, are the ones who are helping to reinvent – even save – the world with their technological wizardry and environmental passion (or they have the ability to, anyway). And yet we infantilize them, calling them kidults, pre-adults, adultescents, thereby disempowering them.Those new nicknames for twentysomethings have come on the heels of a documented shift in life scripts. Marriage and parenthood – once considered the goalposts of adulthood – have been moved back. The average age at first marriage in Canada is older than ever before. Between 1972 and 2008, it changed from 22.5 to 29.1 for women and from 24.9 to 31.1 for men, according to Statistics Canada. But many of the experts who have jumped into the fray to analyze this shift have only helped to further marginalize the young. In his 2004 book Emerging Adulthood: The Winding Road from Late Teens Through the Twenties, Jeffrey Jensen Arnett legitimized delayed adulthood and the failure-to-launch syndrome by recommending that the period be considered “a new developmental phase” during which complex brain functions fully mature. He encourages Millennials to think of their 20s as lost odyssey years, to be spent without a care before real life starts at 30.That message troubles Meg Jay, a clinical psychologist whose new book is The Defining Decade: Why Your Twenties Matter – and How to Make the Most of Them Now. “Twentysomethings interpret that as ‘I’m not a grown-up. My real life hasn’t started yet,’” she says on the phone from Charlottesville, Va., where the 43-year-old mother of two has a private clinical practice with young adults. “I can’t tell you how many times in a week young people say to me, ‘My relationship may not be right, but it doesn’t count’ or ‘My job doesn’t count’ or ‘These years don’t count.’ That’s the disservice of the emerging adulthood message. They think real adulthood comes later and [they] say, ‘I’ll start panicking and get going at 29.’ What they don’t realize is that they’ve missed what are developmentally the most critical years of adulthood.”The cultural majority has a top-down wiser-than-thou parental attitude toward the young, so the angst of the twentysomething is pathologized. Some of that comes from our own memories of youth. We may want to look like a 20-year-old – and we can try, of course, if we’re okay with having a sculpted, Botoxed uniface – but we recall our youthful mindset as bumpy. I think of my 20s as a time of effortless exterior beauty masking unattractive inner turmoil. As you get older, that balance shifts – you get prettier and smoother on the inside while the exterior deteriorates. If only I could flash my full-frontal cortex!But I don’t think we should try to erase the uncertainty that comes with the wrinkle-free territory. It’s productive. It drives you to figure yourself out. That’s what we all did. Helicopter parents who want to smooth their children’s path to a mistake-free adulthood are irresponsible. Failures are evidence of experimentation and they can lead to better careers and healthier relationships as the person learns what he or she really wants. Interestingly, the publishers of Jay’s book suggested that she aim it at the parents of twentysomethings. But she refused. Young people should take responsibility for their lives – and we should let them.I hate that adage that youth is wasted on the young. It’s so defeatist, and it comes with a whiff of patronizing bitterness and jealousy. Usually, it is uttered by people who are older, who somehow resent the young – the beauty and possibility they possess and the fresh intelligence that threatens those in positions of authority.It’s far more responsible and generous to think of youth as a stage we all get a chance to dance on. As Millennials take their turn, we should be ushering them into the spotlight, clearing them a space, not as some sideshow, but to attentively listen and watch in order to see where the world could be headed.Question: What are the problems, flaws, or gaps in the argument? Even if you think it’s basically strong, why might some reasonable people disagree with the author? What objections can you raise about the argument? Try hard to be rigorous, but if you really can’t find “flaws,” what new questions and areas for development does the argument raise?
How does Turgenev explore the idea of love in “First Love?” How might the novella be said to explore and
How does Turgenev explore the idea of love in “First Love?” How might the novella be said to explore and interrogate different views, as well as experiences, of love? To what ends? How does age affect these views and experiences? How might love, for all of its supposed joys, be so problematic? To what ends?NOVEL- FIRST LOVE BY TURGENEV
Hi, my is Willem and really need help with this.Syntax Activity 2Example:1. The girls love sushi. Indicate the grammatical category
English Assignment Writing ServiceHi, my is Willem and really need help with this.Syntax Activity 2Example:1. The girls love sushi. Indicate the grammatical category of each of the words in the following sentences. Please use the tree diagram.2. That boy has won many races.3. Mary will finish her homework in the library.4. A strong wind uprooted the tall trees.5. My dog is exceptionally smart.
Use the passage below to answer the question 1-Which of the following describes the type of writing in the passage
Use the passage below to answer the question 1-Which of the following describes the type of writing in the passage Russian Blue cats known for their plush silver-blue coat and green-colored eyes are intelligent playful and emotional creatures. Russian Blues are loyal, devoted, and affectionate to their owners and tend to be shy towards strangers. Even though their voices are softer in volume they are still extremely vocal cats. Russian Blues enjoy playing fetch, which is not often found with other cat breeds They can be trained for tricks and enjoy kicking balls around for play.-Entertaining -Expository-Persuasive-Creative
Interpret how Recha’s discussion with Daja (3:1) relates to the self-awareness she has when she meets the Templar (3:2) and
Interpret how Recha’s discussion with Daja (3:1) relates to the self-awareness she has when she meets the Templar (3:2) and the feelings she has afterwards (3:3).2. Interpret how Nathan’s understanding of wisdom (3:5) relates to the thoughts he has in response to Saladin’s question (3:6) and to the answer he gives to that question (3:7).3. What was the Templar’s character development in this play?4. In the final scene, Nathan calms Recha, telling her “As long as your heart is still yours…you haven’t lost your father!” How would you relate that to the account (in 4:7) of Nathan’s adoption of Recha after losing his family? What would you say is the role of religion for people like Nathan in times of war?
GO TO NEWSELA.COM , search up story ” who declares the election winner “? On the reading level MAX Identify
GO TO NEWSELA.COM , search up story ” who declares the election winner “? On the reading level MAX Identify and explain the authors perspectives as the writing this text. How are they possibly affected by or involved in this topic ? What evidence supports your answer ? Identify and explain the authors exigence for writing this text . What issue , problem , or situation needs to be resolved ?Identify and explain the authors context of this text . What was happening that promoted the authors to write for their audience ?Identify and explain the authors message . What were they say ? What evidence from the text support your answer ? Identify and explain the audience for whom the author were writing . What evidence from the text supports the claim ? 6.Identify and explain the authors purpose for writing this text. What do they hope to achieve ? PLEASE PLEASE HELP ME I REALLY NEED IT
identify sentences I am going to the mall, to the cellphone company, and to the movies this afternoon.complexsimple compoundI think
identify sentences I am going to the mall, to the cellphone company, and to the movies this afternoon.complexsimple compoundI think that having technology is great, but I would not trade my childhood for anything in the world.complexsimplecompound-complexOur parents always stayed at home either watching TV or cleaning the house.complexsimplecompoundThere were simpler times, and people were less stressed.complexsimplecompound-complexAll the kids would gather outside and climb on their two wheelers together.complexsimplecompound

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