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19 Nov
2020

Craft a response comparing the three (3) Reconstruction plans:Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction (10%…

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Craft a response comparing the three (3) Reconstruction plans:Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction (10% Plan) – LincolnAndrew Johnson’s Reconstruction PlanCongressional Reconstruction Plan (Congress)Then, address one (1) of the following for your selections:Analyze if the South should have been treated as a defeated nation or as a rebellious states.Explain how the American culture and society changed in the North versus the South during Reconstruction.Analyze the impact of the Compromise of 1877 that ended Reconstruction on African-Americans.
Place the events related to World War II in the correct sequence, following the signing of a mutual defense treaty
Place the events related to World War II in the correct sequence, following the signing of a mutual defense treaty by Japan and Germany. -a.)1. The German army conquers much of Scandinavia and defeats France. 2. Nazis destroy Jewish homes, businesses and synagogues during Kristallnacht. 3. France and Great Britain declare war on Germany. -b.)1. Nazis destroy Jewish homes, businesses and synagogues during Kristallnacht. 2. France and Great Britain declare war on Germany. 3. The German army conquers much of Scandinavia and defeats France. -c.)1. Nazis destroy Jewish homes, businesses and synagogues during Kristallnacht. 2. The German army conquers much of Scandinavia and defeats France. 3. France and Great Britain declare war on Germany. -d.)1. France and Great Britain declare war on Germany. 2. Nazis destroy Jewish homes, businesses and synagogues during Kristallnacht. 3. The German army conquers much of Scandinavia and defeats France.Select an argument used in favor of U.S. involvement in World War II. -a.)The rise and spread of fascism threatens the entire globe. -b.)The United States waited too long to enter World War I. -c.)U.S. military intervention would quickly defeat the Germans. -d.)As the world’s greatest power, the U.S. has an obligation to step in.Choose the statement that describes a cause of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. -a.)Roosevelt insisted that Japan end its alliance with Germany. -b.)Japanese Americans were involuntarily detained in the U.S. -c.)To protect its interests in the Pacific, the U.S. imposed economic sanctions against Japan. -d.)The U.S. urged China to intervene in Japan’s empire-building in the Pacific.Choose the statement that best reflects the experiences of African Americans after the United States entered World War II. -a.)”Over 90% of us were relocated against our will to assembly centers during the war.” -b.)”We were faced with the possibility of deportation even though we were U.S. citizens.” -c.)”We began a civil rights campaign to achieve both a victory in Europe and a victory over racism in the U.S.” -d.)”Although our wages were far lower, we earned more money than we ever had before in the workplace.”Choose the statement that accurately reflects the relationship between private business and the federal government during World War II. -a.)”The federal government encouraged us to continue producing consumer goods to keep American citizens happy.” -b.)”The government rejected deficit spending as a way to finance war production.” -c.)”Most defense contracts went to small businesses like the one I own.” -d.)”Since the government guaranteed a profit on sales, our corporation accepted a defense contract.”Choose the statement that describes an economic consequence of the United States as an “arsenal of democracy.” -a.)”President Roosevelt nationalized the shipping and shipbuilding industries.” -b.)”As the war continued, the supply of weaponry became greater than demand and prices fell.” -c.)”The U.S. manufacturing sector produced less than the Axis powers did.” -d.)”My factory converted its production lines to produce bombers, and we hired more workers.”Why was the United States reluctant to launch a land invasion of Japan? -a.)American soldiers could not get close enough to Japan to launch an effective invasion. -b.)By capturing nearby islands, the U.S. could install military bases to keep Japan in check. -c.)Japan had a larger army and more airplanes and submarines than the Americans. -d.)Savage fighting and heavy American casualties occurred in the battles on Iwo Jima and Okinawa.Choose which phrase was a factor in President Truman’s decision to drop atomic bombs on Japan. -a.)Japan had also developed the atomic bomb -b.)Pressure from China -c.)Prevention of Soviet expansion in Asia -d.)Congress demanded an immediate end to the warWhich statement accurately reflects reasons why the U.S. government adopted containment as a foreign policy strategy? -a.)To avoid American casualties stemming from an invasion of the Soviet Union -b.)The Soviet Union was too small and insignificant to warrant direct intervention. -c.)The United States wanted to expand free markets around the world. -d.)The United States wanted to be considered the lone world power.Which statement describes events associated with the conference at Yalta? -a.)Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill met at this conference to discuss the future of eastern Europe. -b.)The Allies committed to pursuing an unconditional surrender from Japan. -c.)Allied leaders finalized plans to divide both Germany and Berlin into four zones. -d.)War reparations were set for Germany to compensate Allied nations for their losses.Choose the statement that best describes an example of U.S. containment policy. -a.)The United States formed an alliance with countries in South America and Africa to stand together against Soviet aggression. -b.)Allied forces dug smuggling tunnels to West Berlin to get food and medicine to people inside the blockade. -c.)U.S. and U.K. planes delivered more than two million tons of supplies to the Western zones of Berlin. -d.)The United States established anti-communist leagues to encourage capitalism in eastern Europe.President Truman issued an executive order in 1947 that provided the FBI with broad powers to investigate communist ties among which group of people? -a.)Recent immigrants -b.)Active military members -c.)Labor union members -d.)Federal employeesChoose the statement that best reflects the idea that those who didn’t conform to the American way were threats to the nation. -a.)”Patriotism is a problematic ideology because it stifles free speech.” -b.)”I love science fiction movies and television shows because space aliens and nuclear technology are good escapist entertainment.” -c.)”Republicans have communist sympathies and support policies that weaken our country.” -d.)”Homosexuals and lesbians are morally weak and likely to betray this country.”Match the G.I. Bill with an effect it had on economic expansion in the 1950s. -a.)The local university reported an increase in graduates and thus an increase in the number of white collar workers in the community. -b.)Women turned their focus to motherhood and raising children and stayed out of the labor force. -c.)Local steel and lumber mills were working at full capacity to meet the new needs of the economy. -d.)A state census noted the trend of families moving out of the city center and to the outer edges of the city.Which statement about conformity in the 1950s is FALSE? -a.)Women in the 1950s were oftentimes portrayed as perfect homemakers, increasing conformist expectations. -b.)Many Americans were having children in the 1950s. -c.)Men and women were increasingly delaying marriage in the 1950s. -d.)Popular media reinforced conformity in the 1950s by popularizing gender stereotypes.Choose the true statement about the consequences of President Nixon’s policy of Vietnamization. -a.)American troops were fully withdrawn from Vietnam by 1971. -b.)The United States launched a full-scale invasion of North Vietnam. -c.)Antiwar protests intensified with President Nixon’s announcement that he was bombing Cambodia. -d.)Vietnamese Americans were threatened with internment in government-run camps.Determine the true statement about the American economy during the 1970s. -a.)Increased federal spending on the Vietnam War and the Great Society kept the economy strong. -b.)Manufacturing centers in the Rust Belt began to grow and create more jobs. -c.)Deflation exposed underlying economic problems that had developed since the end of World War II. -d.)The United States experienced a trade deficit for the first time in the 20th century.Match the 1970s court case Milliken v. Bradley with the quotation that voices a reaction to it. -a.)”This is an important victory for women and their family planning choices.” -b.)”I do not support forced busing within the Detroit school system.” -c.)”My children were bused across district lines to achieve desegregation in Charlotte.” -d.)”We strongly protest the job loss and discrimination suffered because of this ruling.”Match the press with its role in uncovering the Watergate scandal. -a.)A district judge pressured the burglars to identify other participants in the Watergate break-in by threatening them with harsh sentences. -b.)Hearings held by a Senate committee led several former members of the administration to confess their roles in the scandal. -c.)The Committee to Re-elect the President leaked a forged letter, supposedly written by presidential hopeful Edmund Muskie. -d.)The White House was implicated in the Watergate scandal by information provided by an anonymous government source to Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.Arab members of OPEC imposed an oil embargo on the United States in response to American support of which country? -a.)Syria -b.)Israel -c.)Egypt -d.)ChinaMatch the statement “Before the federal government can begin a project, it has to consider possible environmental impacts and write up a report,” with the 1970s environmental legislation it represents. -a.)The Clean Water Act -b.)The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) -c.)The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) -d.)The Energy Policy and Conservation Act
· What name was used to identify those opposing the ratification of the new Constitution? · Influential opponents of the
· What name was used to identify those opposing the ratification of the new Constitution? · Influential opponents of the new Constitution such as Samuel Adams and Patrick Henry forcefully argued the traditional view that a sovereign national government would inevitably become _______· From an economic standpoint, many opponents of the new Constitution feared that it favored what groups over others?· Proponents of ratification of the new Constitution, such as James Wilson, offered a radical new interpretation of sovereignty. What was this interpretation?· In the new ‘federal” system created by the Constitution, neither the states nor the national government was what?· Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution gives the “federal” (i.e. the national) government final authority over certain areas. What were those areas?· In Federalist Number 10, James Madison observed that a republic must guard against a __________ that selfishly disregarded the rights of ___________· In a radical break from traditional republican thought, James Madison argued that a good republican government should be structured to deal with factions in what way?· How did the Federalists propose to deal with the problem of factions in a republic?· What was the most important concession the Federalists made to secure ratification?
can you tutor not just general answers try to go more in depth. Despite its overall economic strength, the Soviet
can you tutor not just general answers try to go more in depth. Despite its overall economic strength, the Soviet Union was an economic failure for consumers. Why do you think that it was so difficult to adapt to consumer needs? What do you think was the most successful aspect of the Marshall Plan? In 1956, the Soviets invaded Hungary after the people protested and wanted more freedoms. Similarly, in 1968, they invaded Prague, after the “Prague Spring” opened up dialogue, culture, and freedom of expression. In both cases, the U.S. and Europe did virtually nothing. Despite our anti-Communist beliefs, the Truman Doctrine, which promised support for ALL oppressed peoples, the U.S. simply ignored the pleas of these countries. Is it right? What could the U.S. have done? In what ways are we willing to stand up for freedom and in what ways are we not willing? And how do these varying responses affect the U.S. both positively and negatively?Link: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/putins-way/I just had you watch a film about Vladimir Putin. He is currently at the height (or near it) of his popularity in Russia, and yet, since the downing of flight MH17, Russia is also currently facing punitive sanctions. Furthermore, President Obama, while still in office, accused Russia of breaking the 1987 missile treaty. While relations with Russia, are nowhere near as bad as they were during the Cold War, it does appear that Putin is taking cues from the old Soviet playbook. Furthermore, there are now investigations into possible Russian “interference” in the recent election (to be clear, there is no current released evidence that there was actual tampering with voting, but that there may have been Russian involvement with propaganda, online posting, “fake” news, etc. Also, while this is certainly something that the U.S. has never been on the receiving end of before, these are the types of things that the U.S./CIA is often accused of.Now that you have played Prisoner’s Dilemma, and have read a bit more on both the U.S. and Soviet perspectives of the Cold War, I have 2 questions: 1. How would you compare the current situation to the Cold War and; 2. If you were to advise the President, what approach would you recommend that the U.S. take in its relationship to Russia and Putin?Had you heard of these allegations before? If so, did the information in the documentary change your impression of either Putin, Russia or these allegations.
-Which country is most to blame for the start of the Cold War, the United States or the Soviet
-Which country is most to blame for the start of the Cold War, the United States or the Soviet Union? Explain your argument based on historical facts. -One of the major trends since World War II has been the increasing unification of Europe, Africa, and other regions. There has also been increasing international cooperation, as well as increased world trade and migration. Has this been a positive development?
For this assignment, I have to research an imperial country that was taken over during the Age of Imperialism. When
History Assignment Writing ServiceFor this assignment, I have to research an imperial country that was taken over during the Age of Imperialism. When conducting my research i need to use the following guiding questions to help to formulate my paragraph structure and drive my findings. ProcessStep 1: Identify the selected country.Step 2: Use guiding questions to help formulate your writing and complete essaySection 1: Colonial Parent Country Who colonized your country? When did they take over? Why and how did they take over?Section 2: Independence of your Country When did your country gain independence? Who was involved in the process of independence? (Countries, individuals, etc.) How did your country gain independence? (Violence, Peaceful, be descriptive)Section 3: Lasting Impact/Effects of Imperialism What were the lasting effects of imperialism for your country (language, religion, culture) What is your country looking like in the year 2020 (outside of coronavirus) What are the positive and negative effects of imperialism within your country.
Primary Source Documentwith Questions (DBQs)THE POTSDAM DECLARATION (JULY 26, 1945)Introduction The dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki
Primary Source Documentwith Questions (DBQs)THE POTSDAM DECLARATION (JULY 26, 1945)Introduction The dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki remains among the most controversial events in modern history. Historians have actively debated whether the bombings were necessary, what effect they had on bringing the war in the Pacific to an expeditious end, and what other options were available to the United States. These very same questions were also contentious at the time, as American policymakers struggled with how to use a phenomenally powerful new technology and what the long-term impact of atomic weaponry might be, not just on the Japanese, but on domestic politics, America’s international relations, and the budding Cold War with the Soviet Union. In retrospect, it is clear that the reasons for dropping the atomic bombs on Japan, just like the later impact of nuclear technology on world politics, were complex and intertwined with a variety of issues that went far beyond the simple goal of bringing World War II to a rapid close.The Potsdam Declaration was issued on July 26, 1945 by U.S. President Harry Truman, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and President Chiang Kai-shek of the Republic of China, who were meeting in Potsdam, Germany to consider war strategy and post-war policy. Soviet leader Joseph Stalin also attended the Potsdam Conference but did not sign the Declaration, since the Soviet Union did not enter the war against Japan until August 8, 1945. (1) WE—THE PRESIDENT of the United States, the President of the National Government of the Republic of China, and the Prime Minister of Great Britain, representing the hundreds of millions of our countrymen, have conferred and agree that Japan shall be given an opportunity to end this war.(2) The prodigious land, sea and air forces of the United States, the British Empire and of China, many times reinforced by their armies and air fleets from the west, are poised to strike the final blows upon Japan. This military power is sustained and inspired by the determination of all the Allied Nations to prosecute the war against Japan until she ceases to resist.(3) The result of the futile and senseless German resistance to the might of the aroused free peoples of the world stands forth in awful clarity as an example to the people of Japan. The might that now converges on Japan is immeasurably greater than that which, when applied to the resisting Nazis, necessarily laid waste to the lands, the industry, and the method of life of the whole German people. The full application of our military power backed by our resolve, will mean the inevitable and complete destruction of the Japanese armed forces and just as inevitably the utter devastation of the Japanese homeland.(5) Following are our terms. We will not deviate from them. There are no alternatives. We shall brook no delay.(6) There must be eliminated for all time the authority and influence of those who have deceived and misled the people of Japan into embarking on world conquest, for we insist that a new order of peace, security and justice will be impossible until irresponsible militarism is driven from the world.(7) Until such a new order is established and until there is convincing proof that Japan’s war‑making power is destroyed, points in Japanese territory to be designated by the Allies shall be occupied to secure the achievement of the basic objectives we are here setting forth.(10) We do not intend that the Japanese shall be enslaved as a race or destroyed as a nation, but stern justice shall be meted out to all war criminals, including those who have visited cruelties upon our prisoners. The Japanese Government shall remove all obstacles to the revival and strengthening of democratic tendencies among the Japanese people. Freedom of speech, of religion, and of thought, as well as respect for the fundamental human rights shall be established.(12) The occupying forces of the Allies shall be withdrawn from Japan as soon as these objectives have been accomplished and there has been established in accordance with the freely expressed will of the Japanese people a peacefully inclined and responsible government.(13) We call upon the government of Japan to proclaim now the unconditional surrender of all Japanese armed forces, and to provide proper and adequate assurances of their good faith in such action. The alternative for Japan is prompt and utter destruction.Questions:1.Why did the United States and its allies issue this declaration? Do you think they expected Japan to comply?2.Why do you think the declaration called for “unconditional surrender”? Do you think the war might have ended sooner, and without the use of the atomic bombs, if the United States had been willing to negotiate a peace with Japan? Why did America not pursue that course?3.Does this declaration suggest that the occupation of Japan will be punitive or constructive? According to the declaration, who bears responsibility for leading Japan down the path to war?4.How would you have responded to this document as a leader in the Japanese government? As an “average” Japanese person at the time?
Why can the Kartilya be considered timeless and relevant to the industrializing and globalizing present? Rewrite portion or a condensed
Why can the Kartilya be considered timeless and relevant to the industrializing and globalizing present? Rewrite portion or a condensed version of the Kartilya ng Katipunan in a way that it can encourage millennials like you to read and practice its teachings.Write one-sentence description of the Kartilya ng Katipunan based from what you have learned during your elementary and/or high school years. What is the significance of artworks such as editorial cartoons, paintings, or photographs in the mapping of history?
Neolithic period – Who, What, When, Where and Why being the historical significanceEXAMPLE: Peloponnesian Wars: A series of two wars
Neolithic period – Who, What, When, Where and Why being the historical significanceEXAMPLE: Peloponnesian Wars: A series of two wars that pitted the Spartan Peloponnesian League against the Athenian Delian League in a battle for supremacy over Classical Greece in the 5th Century BC. The first of these wars was a stalemate created by Spartan Land Supremacy successfully checked by Athenian Naval/Defensive Supremacy. The decisive second war grew from a colonial dispute over the city of Epidamnus. The economic sanctions known as the Megarian Decrees and leveled against the Spartan alliance by Athens, failed to resolve the dispute. Conflict followed. In the end, Athens lost as a result of a Plague which killed their best leader, Pericles, and allowed Nicias and Alcibiades to lead the city into some major blunders including the Battle of Mantinea and the Invasion of Sicily. These disasters resulted in a defection by Alcibiades to Sparta, the decimation of Athenian forces, and the Spartan Invasion of Athens. The Fall of Athens created a power vacuum unfilled by Athens Greek rivals, which allowed the Macedonians to gain supremacy in the Greek World.
1. explain Reaganomics and how it either helped or hurt the economy and the American people. 2. What was the
1. explain Reaganomics and how it either helped or hurt the economy and the American people. 2. What was the Ira-Contra Affair? do you believe Reagan really didn’t know? Why?3. In your own words, what is stagflation and how did we see it affect the American economy?4. Why did the USA get involved in the Persian Gulf War? Was the USA the only country to be involved? if not who was involved?5. What was the reaction of the American people to the Persian Gulf War?

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