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23 Aug
2019

ePortfolio – NO PLAGIARISM

Please read the following instruction very carefully, I need a reflective introduction paper, then I will attach all my essays I wrote for this class below and you need to write several short essays for every single of them. Requirements for those short essays are in the introduction, please read it very carefully!!!
P.S.1300 words for the reflective instruction paper, 1700 words in total for those short essays. MLA format.
Your ePortfolio: Components and Grading Criteria
WR 39C
Logistical Matters: To submit your ePortfolio please make it publicly viewable. (We will talk about how to enable the publicly viewable option.)
Its ContentsThe BasicsRequired Elements:
-Reflective Introduction (1300 words minimum, multimodal)
-Week 1 Self Assessment
-Historical Conversations Project, Graded Version (with or without final grade and comments)
-Advocacy Project, Graded Version
While the required elements will give a basic shape to your ePortfolio, the specific details of its organization are yours to construct. Think of your portfolio as a growing archive that will become full of interesting pieces of evidence as the quarter progresses. You will quickly accumulate artifacts that document your learning. Some of these artifacts will become particularly meaningful. Use them—things like drafts, instructor or peer comments, organizational notes, before and after versions of sentences and paragraphs, final versions of your compositions, for example—to document the work you have done, demonstrate your role in your learning, and articulate your intellectual strategies as they pertain to college level rhetoric, composition, and communication.
Be creative and attentive when making choices about organizing the sections and pages in your portfolio. For example, are the compositions going to serve as major organizational elements by following the reflective introduction in sequential order? Or, are you going to place the compositions and other examples of your best writing together in one “Showcase Writing Section” and organize the other elements of your portfolio in a different manner, along thematic lines, (“Revision Strategies,” “Productive Mistakes”), or in terms of notable developments in your writing (“My Breakthroughs”)?
Reflective Introduction (1300 words minimum)This document introduces you as a college-level writer, thinker, and communicator to a community of your peers. Its fundamental purpose is to illustrate the role you have played in your learning over the course of the quarter in 39C. You take responsibility for the quality of your work in this document (and in your ePortfolio) by assessing your performance. The reflective introduction is an analytically incisive, multi-modal composition that delivers balanced arguments about your learning and supports them with carefully selected pieces of evidence.
Guiding Suggestions for Writing the Reflective Introduction
The reflective introduction should be an analytically rigorous multimodal composition that documents the rich textures of your learning this quarter and perhaps throughout the WR39 sequence of courses (39A, 39B, and 39C).Think of the rest of your ePortfolio as an archive of evidence that you will use in support of the arguments put forward in the introduction.Refer to the various pieces of evidence from the archival portion of the portfolio in the introduction. Guide the reader to them and clearly explain your artifacts.The reflective introduction should address and analyze your learning in the following four areas:
Transferring What You KnowGuiding Prompts: You do not need to answer all of the following questions, select those you find useful.
-Now that you are at the end of 39C (and the Lower Division Writing Requirement), take a look back to where you were at the beginning of the quarter, or even at the beginning of your college-writing experience, and analyze how your practices and habits of researching, writing, and organizing have changed and evolved. You might consult your Week 1 Self Assessment to get you started.
-How have your experiences in your writing classes at UCI influenced your personal history as a writer in academic contexts? Has the WR39 series of courses and 39C in particular influenced your ability to make effective choices about how to approach writing assignments in other classes? Assignments such as lab reports, business memos, blue book exams, short response papers, and any other examples of writing you have been assigned in here at UCI? In other words, have you applied what you learned in the WR 39 series to writing assignments in other classes? Have other classes and assignments influenced your writing process; if so, which ones? Please explain using specific examples.
-Are you using a variety of different strategies to approach your writing assignments in all of your classes? Are you using the same strategies in different contexts as you consider the demands of different situations and assignments? If so, please explain such situations and assignments, and give examples.
-Over the course of this quarter, while you were in WR39C, did you bring any of the strategies you were learning in 39C into the other classes you were taking this quarter to help you with writing assignments in these other classes? Please explain, and use examples.
-Did you bring strategies you learned in your other classes this quarter into 39C? Please explain, and use examples.
Your Composing ProcessGuiding Prompts: You do not need to answer all of the following questions, select those you find useful.
-Your Writing Process: Describe the central strategies of your writing process. When and how did you learn them? How have they changed over time and what experiences have been most influential to you? How do you expect to use them in WR39C? Explain and use examples.
-Have you experienced moments when the light bulb suddenly illuminated? Can you explain why and how this happened?
-Explain what you have learned about the process of generating a research-based composition.
-What have you learned about arranging the elements of your compositions? Have you become more skillful and able to control your presentation of evidence and integrate various pieces of evidence into a coherent and meaningful argument?
-How did conducting research all throughout the drafting process help you to make decisions about the organizational logic of your compositions? In what ways, specifically, did you formulate and reformulate research strategies, framing questions, and guiding claims/arguments by using research?
-Did you carefully select multimodal pieces of evidence? Why did you choose such examples? Did making your argument visible by using multimodality help you to clarify your thesis?
-Explain how your process of writing drafts, source evaluations, and annotations evolved over the course of the quarter. Did you become more effective at pre-writing tasks?
Rhetoric, Argumentation, & Multi-modal CommunicationGuiding Prompts: You do not need to answer all of the following questions, select those you find useful.
-What have you learned about argumentation and persuasion through the process of generating two multi-modal compositions?
-Explain how creating a multi-modal composition helped you to articulate your arguments and understand your ethos as the author.
-How did conducting research all throughout the drafting process help you to make decisions about the organizational logic of your compositions? In what ways, specifically, did you formulate and reformulate research strategies, framing questions, and guiding claims/arguments by using research?
-Did you carefully select multimodal pieces of evidence? Why did you choose such examples? Did making your argument visible by using multimodality help you to clarify your thesis?
-Can you explain how you arrived at the solutions you chose to analyze in your advocacy composition?
-Was there a specific moment when your thesis became clear to you, when the light bulb illuminated, and can you explain what you did to arrive at such a moment of clear insight?
-Did using multimodal elements help you figure out how to arrange your evidence and deliver your argument in a well-put together narrative?
-Explain and demonstrate why and how you used various arguments and counter-arguments and numerous and different sources to strengthen your claims.
RevisionGuiding Prompts: You do not need to answer all of the following questions, select those you find useful.
-Explain your process of revision. How big of a role does revision play in your process of generating and discovering arguments?
-Explain how you benefitted from feedback from your teacher and from your peers both in workshops and in office hours. How do you respond to criticism? What sort of critic are you becoming? Use examples of feedback you received on your work-in-progress, your final versions, and in workshops, as well as advice you gave to your peers to address these questions.
-Analyze how you benefit from writing multiple drafts in terms of argumentative presentation, evidentiary support, and narrative development.
-Explain and analyze the types of revisions that benefit you. Do you make broad, conceptual revisions? Do you make structural revisions and reorganize paragraphs? Do you rewrite sentences? Do you make fine word choices? Do you alter your body of evidence through research or omission?
Supporting MaterialsSelections & SelectingYour portfolio should be populated by numerous artifacts. All of the “process” work you do will generate artifacts; put them into your portfolio as you go along, knowing that you will continue to organize and reorganize it over the course of the quarter. But select the most meaningful artifacts carefully, and write detailed captions for them so that whoever views your ePort understands your reasons for choosing a specific piece of evidence.
Possible Artifacts:
-Examples of your best writing
-“Before-and-After” examples of writing you revised
-Source evaluations and annotations
-Research proposals
-Examples of your writing from other classes in comparison to the writing for your WR 39C course
-Instructor & Peer feedback
-Cellphone pictures of your notetaking strategies, diagrams of your arguments, or other things that represent you and your learning.
-Your source materials: video, pdf files, websites, cartoons, etcetera and so forth
-What else might you select?
Portfolio Grade (30% of Final Course Grade)Grading Method: Reflective Introduction, Captions & Artifacts, and Organization & CreativityThe grade for the reflective introduction establishes the base grade for the portfolio.The quality of the captions for numerous artifacts, and the clarity and creativity of the portfolio’s organization may move the base grade up or down, in increments of 1/3, by one full letter grade. For example, suppose you write a good reflective introduction and receive the grade of B on it, but you submit a very well organized portfolio with detailed captions that explain handfuls of artifacts in meaningful ways. Your overall grade for the portfolio may move up by 1/3, and you would receive the grade of B+ for the portfolio. Suppose you get a B on your reflective introduction but submit an excellent ePortfolio, one that’s meticulous in its organization and is bursting with artifacts and detailed captions. Your grade may go up by 2/3, and you would then receive the grade of A- on the final ePortfolio.There may be no adjustment of the base grade if the other aspects of the ePort are similar in quality to the reflective introduction.Guiding Questions for the Instructor:
-What is the overall quality of the reflective introduction in terms of argumentation? Are the arguments well supported by multimodal evidence? Are the arguments substantive and supported by artifacts? Are the arguments convincing?
-Has the student made persuasive arguments about his or her learning in the four specified areas in the reflective introduction and throughout the portfolio?
-Are there enough artifacts to substantiate the arguments? Are the captions useful and well detailed?
-Is the portfolio well organized? Is it creatively organized?
-Are there typos, grammatical glitches, and other surface-level hitches?
Section-specific guidelines:
In addition to the reflective introduction, final drafts of the HCP and the AP, and self-assessment, you should include an “archive of evidence” consisting of important in-class notes and exercises, low-stakes homework assignments, notes, outlines for assignments, or any other materials you’ve generated this quarter that have contributed to your success on the major projects and in the course.Include at least five pieces of evidence in your archive—these should be brief selections of work that you discuss in your reflective introduction and use to develop your claims about your own progress as a writer. You may include up to 10 pieces of evidence in order to fully demonstrate your progress. Each piece of evidence should be accompanied by a brief caption (a few sentences) that explains its significance to your projects throughout the quarter.Please do not revise final drafts of your HCP or AP—instead, you may choose to revise a small, specific selection with attention to a particular skill and include it in your archive of evidence. Be sure to include a caption explaining what you revised and why, and annotate the changes you made.

QUALITY: 100% ORIGINAL – NO PLAGIARISM.

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