We can Help on: Using Bloom’s Taxonomy Questioning

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Using Bloom’s Taxonomy Questioning to Extend Preschoolers’ Thinking :
Questions rather than answers are the key to shaping the learning development of children. But what is the right way to ask children questions when it comes to engaging them in learning?
A small group of young pupils centers around their teacher on the floor and listens patiently. After pointing out the color yellow once, the teacher asks the kids to find other yellow colored objects in the room. The pupils quickly find a variety of yellow colored items. Before getting bored of the activity, the teacher directs them to the craft table asking: -what other items can you think of that arc yellow? Go and draw or craft them.”
The Origin of the Theory Behind the Questioning Techniques:

There has been a major transition in teaching methods at schools and nurseries. More and more teachers focus on the above illustrated child-initiative approach rather than the conventional teacher-led approach in order to improve pupils’ engagement with the educational material covered in class and to support them in constructing their own higher-level knowledge. Asking children questions and waiting for them to come up with answers is the central idea of this approach.

The educational psychologist Benjamin Bloom was the first researcher who took learning to another level by arguing that children could improve their knowledge skills when they were asked to answer more critical questions by their teachers. In 1956, he developed a hierarchy of questions which would enable teachers to measure and organised their teaching objectives by using six different levels of questioning: remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating. He called this hierarchy the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Bloom proposed that all human beings follow an imaginary ranking of levels when it comes to the complexity of thought. This means that children start to operate at a very “concrete” level of knowledge before they move on to be able to “comprehend” what the facts are. At the next level, children are able to “apply- what they have learned from facts and comprehension. This is the stage where they can demonstrate knowledge and apply it to related situations. Moving on, children can “analyse- what they know such as categorizing information. At the two highest stages of “synthesizing” and “evaluating”, Bloom suggested that children are able to form solutions and make judgments about information and situations.
The educational psychologist Benjamin Bloom was the first researcher who took learning to another level by arguing that children could improve their knowledge skills when they were asked to answer more critical questions by their teachers. In 1956, he developed a hierarchy of questions which would enable teachers to measure and organise their teaching objectives by using six different levels of questioning: remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating. He called this hierarchy the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Bloom proposed that all human beings follow an imaginary ranking of levels when it comes to the complexity of thought. This means that children start to operate at a very “concrete” level of knowledge before they move on to he able to “comprehend” what the facts arc. At the next level, children arc able to “apply- what they have learned from facts and comprehension. This is the stage where they can demonstrate knowledge and apply it to related situations. Moving on, children can “analyse’ what they know such as categorizing information. At the two highest stages of “synthesizing” and “evaluating”, Bloom suggested that children arc able to form solutions and make judgments about information and situations.
Bloom’s Revised Levels of Questioning in the Classroom:

In the early 19905, researchers revised the taxonomy to make the theory more relevant to the needs of children in today’s world. They decided to add an additional step to the hierarchy called creating while deleting the level of synthesizing.
When asking teachers about their preferred activities in class, many will answer that they try to engage young pupils by using Bloom’s questioning techniques. The main idea is that the difficulty of the questions increases by each level. The higher-level questions require deeper thinking and can help children to expand their knowledge on topics or improve their thinking skills.

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