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15 Sep
2020

-first paragraph type a reaction essay on Herbert Penzl:” methods of comparative Germanic linguistics”-paragraph…

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-first paragraph type a reaction essay on Herbert Penzl:” methods of comparative Germanic linguistics”-paragraph two type a reaction essay on Verner’s: “An Exception to Grimm’s Law”-paragraph 3 type a reaction essay on Hogg: “Old English Dialectology”. -I just need two pages worth of these three things-ill add in a conclusion to sum it all up once it is sent to me. The professor wanted us to tie these in together and compare and contrast these.
Artilcle 1, The impact of Customer Retention Strategies in the South African Cellular Industry: The case of the Eastern Free
Artilcle 1, The impact of Customer Retention Strategies in the South African Cellular Industry: The case of the Eastern Free State.Article 2, Factors affecting Customer Retention in Commercial Banks in Tanzania; A case of Azania Bank Arusha.1.Identify the sentences that represent the following academic features in each article. Indicate clearly the article (1 or 2)a) Formalityb) Hedging /Tentativenessc) Accuracyd) Objectivitye) Nominalization2.Write a comparative summary of the findings presented in the two articles. your summary should be 150 words long.A body paragraph consists of a topic sentence and supporting sentences. Cite information from the two article in order to complete the body paragraph that has the topic sentence provide below. Make use of proper APA in- text citations and linking words.
What are concluding sentences? Provide a concluding sentence for this body paragraph. While online learning saves costs, there is no
What are concluding sentences? Provide a concluding sentence for this body paragraph. While online learning saves costs, there is no need to compromise the goals of learning in the interest of cost cutting (Halasa, et al., 2020 p.1137) Online instruction is often done by part time faculty in an institution because it is deemed to be less demanding than traditional learning, eventually online learners will receive less quality education. According to Woldeab et al.(2020) students taking online courses often report lower satisfaction rates with the learning in comparison to students in traditional classroom even when the instructor took time to prepare the learning material (p.2). In an online class, certain factors that contributes to a student’s satisfaction go unnoticed, such factors include the instructor’s enthusiasm, concern, openness and genuine interest to help students (Halasa, et al., 2020 p.1138) Eventually, students will achievement will fall down, retention will diminish and graduation rates on online course will also reduce. Fully online learning institutions are now associated with poor quality education, and graduates are less likely to benefit from their education in comparison to students who underwent traditional learning.
A personal narrative. A narrative is a first-person account of an experience in your life. This will help your instructor
A personal narrative. A narrative is a first-person account of an experience in your life. This will help your instructor get to know you better. Everyone has a story. What is your story? Why is it meaningful? In writing your narrative you should communicate to your reader the meaning and significance of your story.
Create an ePortfolio using Pathbrite from the Discussion Preparation. Refer to your textbook for guidelines on the types of items
Create an ePortfolio using Pathbrite from the Discussion Preparation. Refer to your textbook for guidelines on the types of items you should be including in an ePortfolio. -Briefly explain what you were trying to highlight in your ePortfolio. -Some, but not all, of the things you might want to highlight are your creativity, technical proficiency, and written communication skills. -Discuss how your ePortfolio could be used as an employability tool. -Share the link to your ePortfolio
A particular company that manufactures cosmetics use rabbits to test the irritancy level of its products to their eyes to
English Assignment Writing ServiceA particular company that manufactures cosmetics use rabbits to test the irritancy level of its products to their eyes to make nonirritating cosmetics for the eyes of women who will use such cosmetics. Large doses of any substance be used are injected into one of the rabbits, while the other eye is left alone for comparison of any damage done. This story is one of the situation involving animal testing .Based on your research ,discuss the impact of animal testing from the prespectives of economic and environmental
Use the picture below to help you with your List/Group/Label activity that leads to a K-W-L activity. The topic could
Use the picture below to help you with your List/Group/Label activity that leads to a K-W-L activity. The topic could eventually be shapes, kinds of leaves, or other related topics. Briefly, outline the instructions that you would give the students to complete the List/Group/Label activity. Then, give the instructions that you would use to move the List/Group/Label activity into a K-W-L activity – possibly identifying misconceptions as well.
Compare the depiction of the relationship between humans and the natural world in two of the short stories from Anthony
Compare the depiction of the relationship between humans and the natural world in two of the short stories from Anthony Doerr’s The Shell Collector. pick two of theses short storys “The Shell Collector” (9-39), “The Hunter’s Wife” (40-72), “A Tangle by the Rapid River” (174-183), “July Fourth” (115-129), and “The Caretaker” (130-173).. Are the two stories ultimately anthropocentric or ecocentric in their perspective.
Self-Made Menby Frederick Douglass (1872) From man comes all that we know or can imagine of heaven and earth, of
Self-Made Menby Frederick Douglass (1872) From man comes all that we know or can imagine of heaven and earth, of time and eternity. He is the prolific constituter of manners, morals, religions and governments. He spins them out as the spider spins his web, and they are coarse or fine, kind or cruel, according to the degree of intelligence reached by him at the period of their establishment. He compels us to contemplate his past with wonder and to survey his future with much the same feelings as those with which Columbus is supposed to have gazed westward over the sea. It is the faith of the race that in man there exists far outlying continents of power, thought and feeling, which remain to be discovered, explored, cultivated, made practical and glorified.Mr. Emerson has declared that it is natural to believe in great men. Whether this is a fact, or not, we do believe in them and worship them. The Visible God of the New Testament is revealed to us as a man of like passions with ourselves. We seek out our wisest and best man, the man who, by eloquence or the sword compels us to believe him such, and make him our leader, prophet, preacher and law giver. We do this, not because he is essentially different from us, but because of his identity with us. He is our best representative and reflects, on a colossal scale, the scale to which we would aspire, our highest aims, objects, powers and possibilities.This natural reverence for all that is great in man, and this tendency to deify and worship him, though natural and the source of man’s elevation, has not always shown itself wise but has often shown itself far otherwise than wise. It has often given us a wicked ruler for a righteous one, a false prophet for a true one, a corrupt preacher for a pure one, a man of war for a man of peace, and a distorted and vengeful image of God for an image of justice and mercy.But it is not my purpose to attempt here any comprehensive and exhaustive theory or philosophy or the nature of manhood in all the range I have indicated. I am here to speak to you of a peculiar type of manhood under the title of Self-Made Men.That there is, in more respects than one, something like a solecism in this title, I freely admit. Properly speaking, there are in the world no such men as self-made men. That term implies an individual independence of the past and present which can never exist.Our best and most valued acquisitions have been obtained either from our contemporaries or from those who have preceded us in the field of thought and discovery. We have all either begged, borrowed or stolen. We have reaped where others have sown, and that which others have strown, we have gathered. It must in truth be said, though it may not accord well with self-conscious individuality and self-conceit, that no possible native force of character, and no depth of wealth and originality, can lift a man into absolute independence of his fellowmen, and no generation of men can be independent of the preceding generation. The brotherhood and inter-dependence of mankind are guarded and defended at all points. I believe in individuality, but individuals are, to the mass, like waves to the ocean. The highest order of genius is as dependent as is the lowest. It, like the loftiest waves of the sea, derives its power and greatness from the grandeur and vastness of the ocean of which it forms a part. We differ as the waves, but are one as the sea. To do something well does not necessarily imply the ability to do everything else equally well. If you can do in one direction that which I cannot do, I may in another direction, be able to do that which you cannot do. Thus the balance of power is kept comparatively even, and a self-acting brotherhood and inter-dependence is maintained.Nevertheless, the title of my lecture is eminently descriptive of a class and is, moreover, a fit and convenient one for my purpose, in illustrating the idea which I have in view. In the order of discussion I shall adopt the style of an old-fashioned preacher and have a “firstly,” a “secondly,” a “thirdly,” a “fourthly” and, possibly, a “conclusion.”My first is, “Who are self-made men?” My second is, “What is the true theory of their success?” My third is, “The advantages which self-made men derive from the manners and institutions of their surroundings,” and my fourth is, “The grounds of the criticism to which they are, as a class, especially exposed.”On the first point I may say that, by the term “self-made men,” I mean especially what, to the popular mind, the term least imports. Self-made men are the men who, under peculiar difficulties and without the ordinary helps of favoring circumstances, have attained knowledge, usefulness, power and position and have learned from themselves the best uses to which life can be put in this world, and in the exercises of these uses to build up worthy character. They are the men who owe little or nothing to birth, relationship, friendly surroundings; to wealth inherited or to early approved means of education; who are what they are, without the aid of any favoring conditions by which other men usually rise in the world and achieve great results. In fact they are the men who are not brought up but who are obliged to come up, not only without the voluntary assistance or friendly co-operation of society, but often in open and derisive defiance of all the efforts of society and the tendency of circumstances to repress, retard and keep them down. They are the men who, in a world of schools, academies, colleges and other institutions of learning, are often compelled by unfriendly circumstances to acquire their education elsewhere and, amidst unfavorable conditions, to hew out for themselves a way to success, and thus to become the architects of their own good fortunes. They are in a peculiar sense, indebted to themselves for themselves. If they have traveled far, they have made the road on which they have travelled. If they have ascended high, they have built their own ladder. From the depths of poverty such as these have often come. From the heartless pavements of large and crowded cities; barefooted, homeless, and friendless, they have come. From hunger, rags and destitution, they have come; motherless and fatherless, they have come, and may come. Flung overboard in the midnight storm on the broad and tempest-tossed ocean of life; left without ropes, planks, oars or life-preservers, they have bravely buffetted the frowning billows and have risen in safety and life where others, supplied with the best appliances for safety and success, have fainted, despaired and gone down forever.Such men as these, whether found in one position or another, whether in the college or in the factory; whether professors or plowmen; whether Caucasian or Indian; whether Anglo-Saxon or Anglo-African, are self-made men and are entitled to a certain measure of respect for their success and for proving to the world the grandest possibilities of human nature, of whatever variety of race or color.Though a man of this class need not claim to be a hero or to be worshiped as such, there is genuine heroism in his struggle and something of sublimity and glory in his triumph. Every instance of such success is an example and a help to humanity. It, better than any mere assertion, gives us assurance of the latent powers and resources of simple and unaided manhood. It dignifies labor, honors application, lessens pain and depression, dispels gloom from the brow of the destitute and weariness from the heart of him about to faint, and enables man to take hold of the roughest and flintiest hardships incident to the battle of life, with a lighter heart, with higher hopes and a larger courage.Questions: 1. Which of the following examples most likely fits the author’s profile of a “self-made” individual?A. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect After graduating from Harvard, Jeremy founded a innovative and successful technology company. B. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect During her Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech, Lisa described her childhood in foster care. C. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect Adam won the lottery and never had to go back to his factory job again. D. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect None of the above 2. The passage below (paragraph 2) adds to the development of the text mainly by fill in the blank_____________.Mr. Emerson has declared that it is natural to believe in great men. Whether this is a fact, or not, we do believe in them and worship them. The Visible God of the New Testament is revealed to us as a man of like passions with ourselves. We seek out our wisest and best man, the man who, by eloquence or the sword compels us to believe him such, and make him our leader, prophet, preacher and law giver. We do this, not because he is essentially different from us, but because of his identity with us. He is our best representative and reflects, on a colossal scale, the scale to which we would aspire, our highest aims, objects, powers and possibilities.A. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect providing the author’s argument against Emerson’s leadership theory B. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect providing the author’s argument on the importance of having a leader C. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect introducing the idea that humans tend to seek out leaders D. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect introducing the idea that the best example of leadership is found in religious works 3. Which of the following options best describes the purpose of the following passage (paragraph 6)?Our best and most valued acquisitions have been obtained either from our contemporaries or from those who have preceded us in the field of thought and discovery. We have all either begged, borrowed or stolen. We have reaped where others have sown, and that which others have strown, we have gathered. It must in truth be said, though it may not accord well with self-conscious individuality and self-conceit, that no possible native force of character, and no depth of wealth and originality, can lift a man into absolute independence of his fellowmen, and no generation of men can be independent of the preceding generation. The brotherhood and inter-dependence of mankind are guarded and defended at all points.A. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect The author wants to prove that he is an eloquent speaker. B. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect The author wants to outline the argument for interdependence that his thesis of the “self-made man” will argue against. C. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect The author wants to clarify any misunderstanding about his use of the term “self-made.” D. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect The author wants to prove that he is able to believe in competing theories of individuality and interdependence. 4. Which of these inferences is best supported by the passage below (paragraph 10)?Such men as these, whether found in one position or another, whether in the college or in the factory; whether professors or plowmen; whether Caucasian or Indian; whether Anglo-Saxon or Anglo-African, are self-made men and are entitled to a certain measure of respect for their success and for proving to the world the grandest possibilities of human nature, of whatever variety of race or color.A. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect The author does not judge people based on race or class. B. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect The author thinks that the most successful people are often the ones society thinks of as failures. C. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect The author believes that societal institutions prohibit people from advancing. D. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect The author believes that his speech will help end slavery. 5. Which of the following best summarizes the societal value that the author ascribes to self-made individuals?A. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect He argues that self-made men give hope to humankind through their industrious example. B. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect He argues that self-made men are the backbone of American industry. C. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect He argues that self-made men inspire others to do good in their community. D. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect He argues that self-made men are a good example of how to escape poverty. 6. Which selection from the excerpt best supports the correct answer to Question 5?A. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect “Though a man of this class need not claim to be a hero or to be worshiped as such, there is genuine heroism in his struggle and something of sublimity and glory in his triumph.” B. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect “We seek out our wisest and best man, the man who, by eloquence or the sword compels us to believe him such, and make him our leader, prophet, preacher and law giver.” C. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect “It dignifies labor, honors application, lessens pain and depression, dispels gloom from the brow of the destitute and weariness from the heart of him about to faint, and enables man to take hold of the roughest and flintiest hardships incident to the battle of life, with a lighter heart, with higher hopes and a larger courage.” D. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect “From man comes all that we know or can imagine of heaven and earth, of time and eternity.” 7. Which of the following most likely explains why the author wants to argue the merits of the “self-made man”?A. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect He believes that people are not self-sufficient enough and that they should learn from the self-made individual. B. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect He believes most individuals do not understand how challenging it is to come from difficult life circumstances. C. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect He believes that everyone could benefit from being more self-serving in society. D. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect He believes most individuals have faulty criteria for what makes a great person, and look to unworthy examples. 8. Which sentence from the excerpt best supports the correct answer to Question 7?A. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect “I am here to speak to you of a peculiar type of manhood under the title of ‘Self-Made Men.’” B. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect “He is the prolific constituter of manners, morals, religions and governments.” C. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect “Nevertheless, the title of my lecture is eminently descriptive of a class and is, moreover, a fit and convenient one for my purpose, in illustrating the idea which I have in view.” D. MACROBUTTON HTMLDirect “This natural reverence for all that is great in man, and this tendency to deify and worship him, though natural and the source of man’s elevation, has not always shown itself wise but has often shown itself far otherwise than wise.”
Many plays have premises. Propose a possible thesis for Fences and argue/prove how the play fits the premise. You can
Many plays have premises. Propose a possible thesis for Fences and argue/prove how the play fits the premise. You can comment on August Wilson’s intent in addition to what you see in the play. Be sure to quote several times from the play to help you make your point.
Factors affecting retention in commercial banks in Tanzania; A case of Azania Bank Arusha. The impact of customer retention in
Factors affecting retention in commercial banks in Tanzania; A case of Azania Bank Arusha. The impact of customer retention in the south african cellural industry industry: the case of the eastern free state.1.identify and write the thesis statement in each article2.identify the topic, focus and view point from each article’s tittle3.identify the sentences that represent the following academic features in each article. Indicate clearly the article(1 or 2)identify 6 discourse makers/linking words from each articles and state their functions.

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