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26 Mar
2020

Healthcare professional are trained put… | Good Grade Guarantee!

Please provide a full-page response to each of the below two students postings on Patient Safety with two peer-reviewed references each. Student #1: Telicia Patient Safety Importance of Communication Working in a healthcare setting is unique, regardless if an individual is working in a clinical or nonclinical position. Healthcare professionals are trained to put someone elses needs before their own and it takes a special person to have this responsibility. One of the main responsibilities of clinical and nonclinical healthcare professionals is to ensure patients are safe from falls, medical errors, and hospital acquired infections to name a few. One framework that identifies the root cause of errors, which negatively affect patient safety, is the Charles Vincents Framework. This framework identifies several contributory factors of errors; however, for this discussion the Team framework will be discussed. The Team framework consist of communication, supervision and the willingness to ask for help, and team leadership, which are all essential components to patient care and safety (Wachter & Gupta, 2018). To address these components in providing quality care, an organization must create a patient safety culture, which begins with building trust through communication. According to Miller, Scott and Hirschinger (2015), Safety culture is the foundation for quality and performance improvement wherever healthcare is provided and communication is the foundation to having mutual trust among all healthcare professionals (p. 2). Communication Communication among all staff members is key to increase patient safety. Thus, one responsibility of an Organizational Development Specialist in a hospital setting is to teach good communication skills to both clinical (including physicians) and nonclinical staff and help facilitate team-building activities. The goal of this process being to increase trust among departmental and interdepartmental teams. One method used is the DISC personality test, which can help identify an individuals personality and how to effectively communicate with all personality types. Brady et al. (2017), explored the importance of communication between nurses and doctors, and found that both nurses and doctors understand the importance of good communication and that communication can improve work?ow, enable an effective work environment and decrease medical errors. There are many effective ways to communicate, whether it is verbal communication (phone or face-to-face) or written communication (smartphone, mobile devices, iPad, computers, or paper). Today, utilizing mobile devices is the quick, convenient way to relay information and is perceived to be a safe and effective way to communicate (Bishop, Press, Mendelsohn, & Casalino, 2013). References Bishop, T. F., Press, M. J., Mendelsohn, J. L., & Casalino, L. P. (2013). Electronic Communication Improves Access, But Barriers To Its Widespread Adoption Remain. Health Affairs, 32(8), 13611367. https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2012.1151 Brady, A.-M., Byrne, G., Quirke, M. B., Lynch, A., Ennis, S., Bhangu, J., & Prendergast, M. (2017). Barriers to effective, safe communication and workflow between nurses and non-consultant hospital doctors during out-of-hours. International Journal For Quality In Health Care: Journal Of The International Society For Quality In Health Care, 29(7), 929934. https://doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzx133 Miller, R. G., Scott, S. D., & Hirschinger, L. E. (2015). Improving patient safety: The intersection of safety culture, clinician and staff support, and patient safety organizations [White paper]. Retrieved from Center for Patient Safety https://www.centerforpatientsafety.org/wp-content/themes/patient- safety/pdf/Second-Victims-White-Paper.pdf Wachter, R. M., & Gupta, K. (2018). Understanding patient safety (3rd ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Student #2: Tyshan Patient care is driven by patient safety and the efficacy at which it is delivered by all involved. Risk Managements role is to ensure all staff regardless of their role in patient care are current and adequately trained on the organizations safety guidelines. As the safety field has evolved, there is a growing recognition of the role organizational leadership plays in prioritizing safety, through actions such as establishing a culture of safety, responding to patient and staff concerns, supporting efforts to improve safety, and monitoring progress. (Wachter & Gupta, 2018). According to Miller, Scott and Hirschinger (2015), The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act (PSQIA) is intended to support a culture of safety by encouraging reporting of and learning from adverse events, near misses, unsafe conditions and other related patient safety activities. Braddock III, C.H., Szaflarski, N., Forsey, L., Abel,L., Hernandez- Boussard, T., & Morton, J. (2014) noted that in order to improve patient safety in the hospital setting it is most successful when implementing simulation training; debriefing of medical emergencies; monthly patient safety team meetings; patient safety champion role; interdisciplinary patient safety conferences; and creating a recognition program for exemplary teamwork. Despite being accountable for the quality and safety of care being provided in their organizations, until recently board, executive, and medical staff leadership at most hospitals in the United States placed relatively little emphasis on identifying and addressing safety issues. (Leadership Role in Improving Safety, 2019) In an individuals role where direct patient care is not required, one must make sure that safety protocols are met by following HIPAA guidelines, being knowledge of safety protocols and ensuring documentation meets safety standards. The ultimate role of all involved in managing patient care is to create a balanced environment where the patients plan of care and safety are ensured. References Wachter, R. M., & Gupta, K. (2018). Understanding patient safety (3rd ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Leadership Role in Improving Safety. ( 2019). Retrieved from https://psnet.ahrq.gov/primers/primer/32/Leadership-Role-in-Improving-Safety) Braddock III, C. H., Szaflarski, N., Forsey, L., Abel, L., Hernandez-Boussard, T., & Morton, J. (2014, October 28). The TRANSFORM patient safety project: A microsystem approach to improving outcomes on inpatient units. Journal of General Internal Medicine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4370988/pdf/11606_2014_Article_3067.pdf (9 pages) Miller, R. G., Scott, S. D., & Hirschinger, L. E. (2015). Improving patient safety: The intersection of safety culture, clinician and staff support, and patient safety organizations [White paper]. Retrieved from Center for Patient Safety https://www.centerforpatientsafety.org/wp-content/themes/patient- safety/pdf/Second-Victims-White-Paper.pdf

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