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15 Sep
2020

Lecture 1Saying what texts say and making claims: In this class I will ask…

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Lecture 1Saying what texts say and making claims: In this class I will ask you to assess claims and proofs in primary texts. I will also be working on the assumption that good critical writing at the university level also assesses what critics say in secondary texts.Finally, I will ask you to assess your own claims and proofs and to make sure all your proof works with all of your arguments. I will be asking you to say what they say and what you say.This idea comes from a helpful book on academic writing entitled They Say, I Say. In this text Graff and Berkenstien write about how to enter an academic conversation by writing about what others thinkers say and then saying what you say (19- 29).They Say, I Say presents a model of how to think through ideas. The text talks about how to say what they say (what you are reading) and how to then say what you say (your academic opinion or thesis).Another way of saying this is that in essays you make claims based on claims you see in texts.Note: critical reading helps with critical writing.In primary texts, notice good examples and main points as you read.In secondary texts, read for claims (what a critic or an advertiser or a film maker or musician is saying), you should be able to say what the claims are and then make your own claims.When you read and write arguments based on the texts you are summarizing and synthesising. These are the steps which take you from an opinion piece to an essay about a text which contains a main idea or a thesis. This is the standard at university and also in the workplace, so reading accurately and writing with main claims and proofs in mind is really pragmatic!The first claim I want to summarize in this lecture about culture and media comes from a sociologist who looked at the ways cultures are created and how dominant ideas replicate themselves in something called hegemony.The second claim I will look at is that media allows for replication of hegemony and also resistance to it.Hegemony:Antonio Gramsci, a socialist in Italy in the early part of the twentieth century, began to think about ways in which a society determines and reinforces its rules. He usefully separated the strategies for domination into two categories: coercive and spontaneous. Gramsci writes about the domination of a people through the state and government as being “coercive” rules and laws.Gramsci also writes about the “spontaneous” absorption and replication of rules through “hegemony.”The idea is that there are coercive practices which come through laws and codes, and then rules which are spontaneous, because they are not legally coerced. Spontaneous does not mean sudden here, but outside of coercive laws. For Gramsci, coercive laws are the rules in place which are enforced by the state and are not optional (do not drink and drive, do not commit theft etc.) The other laws, the social practices which keep the dominant structures in place without legal enforcement are the hegemonic discourses (morals, manners, romantic practices, ideas about honour or dishonour etc.)Although Gramsci writes about social and cultural domination by state law and by social practices that are not legally regulated, rather than about media, I think that looking at media is entirely about looking at the ways the culture gets created and replicated through the hegemonic discourse.In simple terms, the hegemonic discourse is the conversation about culture that goes on outside the legal system – the things we “know” are “right” because we learn them in school, at church, and through media.Discourses are conversations- they can be written and unwritten, spoken and unspoken.Think about the rules outside of the law you know and where they came from (parents, school, church, and media).You will probably be able to see dominant ideologies (ideas and expectations) that were encoded (given to you directly or indirectly) outside of the legal or state system. Hegemony and the media: you can probably determine elements of dominant ideology learned at school, church, and in family situations, but media is a learning site unlike any other for the transmission of culture.Cultural studies and media studies are related and they both explore the way cultures repeat themselves.A bit of History:In “their introduction to cultural studies in Literary Theory: An Anthology, Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan point out that the “word culture acquired a new meaning in the 1960’s and 1970’s. Prior to that time, culture was associated with art, literature and classical music” (1233).A person was cultured because that person was educated about art and music and literature. People were not cultured if they were not educated about art and literature and music. If you look at literature and art and music you can certainly see people who are not educated about such things being represented as dangerous or funny. This is very much still the case in mass media (TV and magazines and radio and online). Rivkin and Ryan point out that the study of what defines the culture of a people changes and that “anthropologists have always used the word “culture” in a much broader sense to mean forms of life and of social expression. The way people behave while eating, talking with each other, becoming sexual partners, interacting at work, engaging in ritualized social behaviour such as family gatherings , and the like constitute a culture ” (1234).Rivkin and Ryan also point out that “since the advent of Marxism in the nineteenth century, people have come to think of culture as being political” (1234).Media and Culture:The study of “television, advertising and popular magazines became objects of analysis in the new field of cultural studies (1234)” and became a new field of study in the mid-to late half of the twentieth century.Views about media Rivkin and Ryan usefully point out that thinkers on media believe that it is created by and echoes forms of domination.That is, media (TV, movies, films, novels, graphic novels, music, online media etc.) echo hegemonies and allow for the manipulations of consumers.Rivkin and Ryan also point out that representational codes and techniques shape our perceptions in extreme ways in television (camera angels, close up shots of villains and flattering midrange shots of heroes, sinister music etc.) The ways in which dominant ideas are replicated are part of the way television looks and feels. Although it may seem impossible to resist the cultural norms being reinforced in ads and on television programs, it is not quite so simple, and Rivkin and Ryan also argue that resistance to hegemony is also part of media.That is, resistance to domination can also be created and enacted by media. (TV, movies, films, novels, graphic novels, music, online media etc.):culture comes from below, and while it can be harnessed in profitable and ultimately socially conservative ways, it also represents the permanent possibility of eruption, of dissonance, and of an alternate imagination of reality. (1234) Summing UP:Thoughts to ponder:We receive ideas about culture in coerced legal ways and in non-coerced or learned ways (hegemony).Media can repeat established and dominant hegemonies (we can see the ideas of standard gender roles, beauty, success, intelligence being repeated in media).Media can also interrupt, object to, and oppose dominant hegemonies. Robert Kolker and Media Terms: Robert Kolker is an important media critic who asks a number of questions in the preface of Media Studies; An Introduction about the history and the “cultural place” of media (preface 1). Kolker looks at the historical and cultural place of media and at “our role: as audience in their creation, completion, and comprehension” (preface 1).A Few of Kolker’s important claims for this class:The importance of self and cultural evaluation: Kolker stresses the interconnectivity of the consumers of media and the culture and insists that the “audience is part of the media text and that text is intricately connected with the cultures that surround and infiltrate it” (40). Class and social status are related to status: Although class is a Marxist term (the options for Marx are proletariat or bourgeoisie) Kolker writes about class and social status as if they are the same thing. That is, for Kolker, class is the status the culture gives a person. Kolker also claims that in the media sphere, we are all being created and are creating certain social positions without necessarily knowing we are doing so. He makes an interesting claim about our interaction with media arguing that we are surrounded by media in a way that might make us oblivious to it, but at some level of engagement our minds and emotions – our consciousness- are always at work decoding a message. That work- of understanding, or mediating media- is what media studies is about and what this book is about. (preface 1)Kolker cites Marshall McLuhan, as an important earlier thinker who wrote about being surrounded by media. Kolker notes that McLuhan, “in his ground breaking book, Understanding Media, considers media as extensions of human consciousness” (Preface 1). Kolker extends McLuhan’s idea to claim that media is not only an “add-on, an addition to our knowledge of ourselves and our world,” but a process. He suggests that “In the larger sense, anything that represents something to us for our response…is a mediation” (Preface 1).This idea, that consumers of media make meaning as they take in media,is important. It is an idea that implies that the audience needs to be interested in and aware of itself, rather than condemning media and those who choose not to consume it.Kolker on Audience: “…we all live in a media sphere. It is much more interesting to understand our relation to this environment than to condemn it or people who don’t resist it” (16). If you understand this point you can write about what audiences are consuming and making in their mediation with media without becoming mired in opinions and simplistic judgements. It allows for a feminist reading of the The Big Bang Theory for example without dismissing or condemning its initial mass appeal, and without siding with the audience. The idea here is that that media has an audience and being specific about audience helps us avoid generalizations. (We don’t get stuck in writing about what we like and don’t like, but can argue about what we think the audience sees, responds to, understands, and why). Overall, that means, as we write about media texts it is important to be specific about the audience. Words like middle income, female, male, fluid, gender queer are specific, so are words like: adult, male, retired, culturally diverse etc. Always use specific words instead of vague ones like “us” “our” “society today” etc. Kolker on Art and Artifact: he suggests calling the “productions of mass media,” “artifacts,” or “works.” He also points out that “the objects that are made for mass consumption” are different from the “fine or small audience art” (18). This may be a helpful way to write about the “artifacts or works” that get made for specific audiences and by different makers with distinctive agendas.I will generally follow Kolker and write about works. I will also write about media works and texts, interchangeably (I am not talking only about items with pages when I talk about texts).Codes and Genres: “Language, discourse, and our ability to share its meaning all exist through a process of coding and decoding” (21) Discourse is written or spoken conversation that often repeats shared meanings. Kolker suggests always being aware of coding and decoding. For example clothing is coded and needs to be decoded when we study media. Eg. When I was younger I wore a school uniform. I wore a school blazer to show I was a learner and to demonstrate the required respect for my teachers. Now, when I teach or speak publically, I wear a blazer to show I am a teacher and to signal respect for my audience (same symbol, different coded meaning). Genre or “kind” (25). As we study media we will look at the ways genres are coded. For example, a news or current affairs program is different on Fox than on NBC or The Comedy Network, so the genre of the news program is being renegotiated. The coded messages shift in “hard news” (NBC Nightly News) and “satire” (The Daily Show). Kolker also issues a warning to pay attention to the agendas of business in media studies.Remember the agenda of business: “There is no doubt that the business element in the media design has designs on us” (29).The idea that media in a converged age is inseparable from business, is very important. So, what do we do with all of this?These terms will come up as we work through course materials but for now, be mindful of the ideas of hegemony and codes and how they are created and of the idea that the audience is making its own meaning as you read this week’s text.BELOW IS THE READING OR THE WEEK.Harry Potter did help shape the political culture of a generationAugust 19, 2014 1.15am EDTAuthor* ?* Anthony Gierzynski Professor in Political Science, University of Vermont Disclosure statementAnthony Gierzynski does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.PartnersView all partners?We believe in the free flow of informationRepublish our articles for free, online or in print, under Creative Commons licence.Republish this article?Some well-thumbed political tracts. Mike Chaput, CC BY-NC-SA* Email* Twitter173* Facebook1.1k* LinkedIn* PrintThe idea that entertainment has an effect on our politics might seem ludicrous to some. Many would scoff at the notion that the Star Wars saga might have influenced the political socialisation of Generation X. Or that the music that the baby boomers listened to played a supporting role in the development of that generation’s politics.And perhaps, most ridiculous of all, is the idea that JK Rowling’s immensely popular tale of the boy-who-lived could have played a role in the political development of that generation, the Millenials. Let alone an election result. But this is exactly what some recent research of mine indicates.I found empirical support for the idea that the Harry Potter series influenced the political values and perspectives of the generation that came of age with these books. Reading the books correlated with greater levels of acceptance for out-groups, higher political tolerance, less predisposition to authoritarianism, greater support for equality, and greater opposition to the use of violence and torture. As Harry Potter fans will have noted, these are major themes repeated throughout the series. These correlations remained significant even when applying more sophisticated statistical analyses – when controlling for, among other things, parental influence.I’m not saying, Rita Skeeter like, that “Harry Potter helped Obama get elected” or that “Harry Potter books brainwashed millennials”, as much of the coverage of my research indicated. It’s of course much more nuanced than this. And in a world where consumption of entertainment media is escalating, allowing many to avoid news coverage altogether in favour of fun, thinking about this is more important than ever.?More recognisable than any political logo. Dave Catchpole, CC BY-SAWho is rational?Scepticism of the notion that our entertainment consumption shapes our political perspectives only has traction if you think that we arrive at our political views rationally. And there’s a long record of research in multiple disciplines (psychology, sociology, and political science to name a few) that thoroughly debunks the notion that we acquire political values and attitudes through a rational process.And research into how we immerse ourselves in stories has demonstrated that we do not process ideas in entertainment the same way we process information – we react on a more emotional level, at a distance from real world facts.The next scornful retort is that people’s choice of entertainment will reflect their pre-existing political views. But the argument of selective exposure – that we only consume media that is congruent with our existing beliefs – is less applicable to entertainment than it is to overly political media.We’re often drawn to stories for reasons that may have nothing to do with our views. This may be its popularity, attention given to it in the media, critical reviews, special effects, advertising, boredom, inadvertent exposure when we have little choice – the reasons go on. And once we’re immersed in the book, TV programme, film or whatever, once we’ve come to identify with certain characters we are, as communications scholars have demonstrated, likely to internalise the lessons of the narrative, and emulate the qualities of those with whom we identify.Selective exposure is also complicated by the fact that the politically relevant lessons of a narrative or the qualities of fictional characters are not always evident early on in the story. And they may evolve throughout it. Take that of Darth Vader, a cultural icon of evil, for example – he turns out to still have some good in him at the end. Or there’s the Cylons of the recent reimagining of Battlestar Galactica, who evolve from genocidal robots to a form of intelligent life deserving acceptance and tolerance.?Kevin Spacey’s House of Cards is a dark take on US politics. EPA/Pete Marovich/PoolWhen we’re consuming entertainment stories it’s likely that we’re more susceptible to politically relevant messages – we’re relaxing, having fun, our political “guard” is down. Indeed, most people are largely unaware of the politically relevant content of that which they watch or read because they are not looking for it. And certain politically relevant messages are so ubiquitous throughout our culture that they become invisible to us. Take the overwhelmingly positive portray of guns in US media – it’s incredibly rare to see a hero without a gun.Selective exposure is also less likely to occur among younger media consumers who have yet to fully form their political views. This is a point especially applicable to the media teenagers consume, like the Harry Potter series.A great volume of research has been devoted to the effects of entertainment on social phenomena such as violence, sex, smoking and drinking. In this light, perhaps it doesn’t seem so ridiculous to give some attention to how entertainment shapes our politics. There have been a handful of published pieces that demonstrate the role of entertainment media, but more empirical research is needed.In addition to Harry Potter, I also have preliminary results from two other recent studies. One, an experiment that found that exposure to different types of science fiction and fantasy villains affected attitudes about criminal justice. And another that found that exposure to Game of Thrones and House of Cards reduced the tendency to believe in a just world.There are certainly methodological issues with teasing out entertainment media effects, but those difficulties have not stopped researchers on other similarly sticky subjects. We need to consider the role of entertainment media in the development of political perspectives, in how citizens see their governments, leaders, and policies. This is something that is ever more important in our era of unlimited media choice.THIS IS WHAT I WOULD LIKE YOU TO RESPOND TO AFTER GOING THROUGH THE LECTURE AND THE READING.Reading Response 1 (Due September 18 @ midnight)Read the lecture and apply the idea of hegemony to the article “Harry Potter did help shape the political culture of a generation”.What are the most compelling claims from the text and why? There is no right answer here. However, I am asking you to write in a semi-formal tone (i.e. do not use plural personal pronouns – we, our, and you). Please double space your submission. (250-500 words max).Please submit is MS Word format.Please provide a Works Cited.Note: the eg. below from OWL for a works cited (MLA):Wise, DeWanda. “Why TV Shows Make Me Feel Less Alone.” NAMI, 31 May 2019, www.nami.org/Blogs/NAMI-Blog/May-2019/How-TV-Shows-Make-Me-Feel-Less-Alone. Accessed 3 June 2019.
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please answer below question Write six (6) MySQL statements to create a database called ‘ABC_REAL_ESTATE’ and the five database tables
please answer below question Write six (6) MySQL statements to create a database called ‘ABC_REAL_ESTATE’ and the five database tables as shown in the case study. You need to choose the most appropriate attribute type for each attribute. The database table design will also minimise the likelihood of data anomalies. Write five (5) MySQL statements to insert five (5) rows into these three tables: PROPERTY, AGENT and VENDOR and three (3) rows into these two tables: PROPERTY_VENDOR and PURCHASE. You may make up the data to be inserted into those tables; however, you must maintain the data integrity of this database. Write one (1) MySQL statement that changes the status of all properties in VIC to ‘under contract’. A new legislation has been passed in Victoria that all apartments in that state must be sold at auction. Write one (1) MySQL statement to update your table or tables accordingly. Case ScenarioYou, as a group, have been contracted by a national real estate agency — ABC Real Estate — to develop the backend database for a property management system (the System). The System shall allow the owners of the agency to track their sales performance, to calculate commissions for their sales agents and to extrapolate business insights from their property sales history. The party who sells a property is normally called ‘the vendor’. They are normally but not always the owners of the property. A property may be owned jointly by multiple people. Thus, there may be more than one vendor for a property. For the purpose of this assessment, please assume that each of the vendors would have the attributes of an individual person. For example: name, gender and age. A vendor will normally engage a sales agent and authorize the agent to run a marketing campaign to sell the property. In return, the sales agent will take a proportion from the sales proceeds as a commission. The commission is calculated at 6% of the property sale price if the property is sold through auction, or 4% of the property sale price if it is sold through other means, for example a private sale. For the purpose of this assessment, please assume that a property can be sold by only one agent. Once the vendor contacts the agent and authorizes them to market the property, the agent will then advertise the property on popular websites such as Domain or Realestate.com.au. At this stage, the property will be labelled as ‘listed’. If the property is auctioned, the highest bidder and the vendor will enter into an unconditional Contract of Sale (‘CoS’) on the auction day and the status of the property will be changed to ‘under contract’. In this assessment, you do not need to consider any other possibilities at auction, e.g., the property is withdrawn or passed in. If the property is not to be auctioned, interested purchasers may approach the agent and make offers on the property. If the vendor accepts the offer, both parties will normally proceed to a conditional CoS, which is subject to conditions, for example, securing a home loan from the bank. At this stage, the status of the property will be changed to ‘under offer’. Once the conditions in the CoS are satisfied and the CoS becomes unconditional, the status of the property will be changed to ‘under contract’. There is normally a one to six month gap between the date when a contract, conditional or otherwise, is entered into and the date that the ownership of the property is transferred from the vendor to the purchaser. The time duration allows the vendor to move out of the house and the purchaser to prepare finances and other paperwork required for the conveyancing of the property. The date on which the ownership is transferred is called the settlement date. Once the property is settled, its status will be changed to ‘settled’. This is when the commission becomes payable to the agent.
a-What is Entity Relationship Diagram(ERD)?Explain EntityType ,Entity ,Attributes ,RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ENTITIES, B-select any ERD diagram from internet and copyitsURLwith it
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Case Scenario You, as a group, have been contracted by a national real estate agency — ABC Real Estate —
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