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14 Mar
2020

Research Paper Skeleton | Good Grade Guarantee!

Abstract— State the problem, your approach and solution, and the main contributions of the paper. Include little if any background and motivation. Be factual but comprehensive. The material in the abstract should not be repeated later word for word in the paper. *CRITICAL: DoNotUseSymbols,SpecialCharacters,orMathinPaper TitleorAbstract.
Keywords—component; formatting; style; styling; insert (key words)
Introduction
The Introduction is crucially important. By the time a referees has finished the Introduction, they have probably made an initial decision about whether to accept or reject the paper — they’ll read the rest of the paper looking for evidence to support his decision. A casual reader will continue on if the Introduction captivated him, and will set the paper aside otherwise. Again, the Introduction is crucially important.
Introduction should consist of paragraphs answering the following five questions:
What is the problem?
Why is it interesting and important?
Why is it hard? (E.g., why do naive approaches fail?)
Why hasn’t it been solved before? (Or, what’s wrong with previous proposed solutions? How does mine differ?)
What are the key components of my approach and results? Also include any specific limitations.
This template, modified in MS Word 2007 and saved as a “Word 97-2003 Document” for the PC, provides authors with most of the formatting specifications needed for preparing electronic versions of their papers. All standard paper components have been specified for three reasons: (1) ease of use when formatting individual papers, (2) automatic compliance to electronic requirements that facilitate the concurrent or later
production of electronic products, and (3) conformity of style throughout a conference proceedings. Margins, column widths, line spacing, and type styles are built-in; examples of the type styles are provided throughout this document and are identified in italic type, within parentheses, following the example. Some components, such as multi-leveled equations, graphics, and tables are not prescribed, although the various table text styles are provided. The formatter will need to create these components, incorporating the applicable criteria that follow.
background or related work
Background Topic

Here you provide description of the foundational elements of your work. For example, here you will define what is a map reduce strategy. How was it developed, its benefits, applications, and others. Similarly you will define all foundational components being used in your research.
Subsection 2
It provides a platform to take a strong critical stance about previous work and provides sufficient comparisons among the technical content of different paper(s).
Implementaion/design
Here is the place for the meat of the paper that includes a clear new important technical contribution, algorithms, system descriptions, new language constructs, analyses, etc. Whenever possible use a “top-down” description: readers should be able to see where the material is going.
Finally, complete content and organizational editing before formatting. Please take note of the following items when proofreading spelling and grammar:
Subsection 1
Define abbreviations and acronyms the first time they are used in the text, even after they have been defined in the abstract. Abbreviations such as IEEE, SI, MKS, CGS, sc, dc, and rms do not have to be defined. Do not use abbreviations in the title or heads unless they are unavoidable.
Subsection 2 with bullet points
Use proper units and terms for descriptions.
Using ambiguous terms and definitions often leads to confusion.
Do not mix complete spellings and abbreviations of units: “Wb/m2” or “webers per square meter”, not “webers/m2”. Spell out units when they appear in text: “. . . a few henries”, not “. . . a few H”.
Use a zero before decimal points: “0.25”, not “.25”. Use “cm3”, not “cc”. (bullet list)
Subsection 3 on Equations
The equations are an exception to the prescribed specifications of this template. You will need to determine whether or not your equation should be typed using either the Times New Roman or the Symbol font (please no other font). To create multileveled equations, it may be necessary to treat the equation as a graphic and insert it into the text after your paper is styled.
Number equations consecutively. Equation numbers, within parentheses, are to position flush right, as in (1), using a right tab stop. To make your equations more compact, you may use the solidus ( / ), the exp function, or appropriate exponents. Italicize Roman symbols for quantities and variables, but not Greek symbols. Use a long dash rather than a hyphen for a minus sign. Punctuate equations with commas or periods when they are part of a sentence, as in
ab 
Note that the equation is centered using a center tab stop. Be sure that the symbols in your equation have been defined before or immediately following the equation. Use “(1)”, not “Eq. (1)” or “equation (1)”, except at the beginning of a sentence: “Equation (1) is . . .”
Sub section 4: Some Common Mistakes
The word “data” is plural, not singular.
The subscript for the permeability of vacuum 0, and other common scientific constants, is zero with subscript formatting, not a lowercase letter “o”.
In American English, commas, semi-/colons, periods, question and exclamation marks are located within quotation marks only when a complete thought or name is cited, such as a title or full quotation. When quotation marks are used, instead of a bold or italic typeface, to highlight a word or phrase, punctuation should appear outside of the quotation marks. A parenthetical phrase or statement at the end of a sentence is punctuated outside of the closing parenthesis (like this). (A parenthetical sentence is punctuated within the parentheses.)
A graph within a graph is an “inset”, not an “insert”. The word alternatively is preferred to the word “alternately” (unless you really mean something that alternates).
Do not use the word “essentially” to mean “approximately” or “effectively”.
In your paper title, if the words “that uses” can accurately replace the word “using”, capitalize the “u”; if not, keep using lower-cased.
Be aware of the different meanings of the homophones “affect” and “effect”, “complement” and “compliment”, “discreet” and “discrete”, “principal” and “principle”.
Do not confuse “imply” and “infer”.
The prefix “non” is not a word; it should be joined to the word it modifies, usually without a hyphen.
There is no period after the “et” in the Latin abbreviation “et al.”.
The abbreviation “i.e.” means “that is”, and the abbreviation “e.g.” means “for example”.
An excellent style manual for science writers is [7].
Results and Analysis
Subsection 1: Figures and Tables
Positioning Figures and Tables: Place figures and tables at the top and bottom of columns. Avoid placing them in the middle of columns. Large figures and tables may span across both columns. Figure captions should be below the figures; table heads should appear above the tables. Insert figures and tables after they are cited in the text. Use the abbreviation “Fig. 1”, even at the beginning of a sentence.

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Table Type Styles :
Sample of a Table footnote. (Table footnote)
Example of a figure caption. (figure caption)
Figure Labels: Use 8 point Times New Roman for Figure labels. Use words rather than symbols or abbreviations when writing Figure axis labels to avoid confusing the reader.
The template will number citations consecutively within brackets [1]. The sentence punctuation follows the bracket [2]. Refer simply to the reference number, as in [3]—do not use “Ref. [3]” or “reference [3]” except at the beginning of a sentence: “Reference [3] was the first …”
Unless there are six authors or more give all authors’ names; do not use “et al.”. Papers that have not been published, even if they have been submitted for publication, should be cited as “unpublished” [4]. Papers that have been accepted for publication should be cited as “in press” [5]. Capitalize only the first word in a paper title, except for proper nouns and element symbols.
For papers published in translation journals, please give the English citation first, followed by the original foreign-language citation [6].
Conclusions and future implications
In general, this is a short summarizing paragraph and under no circumstances should the paragraph simply repeat material from the Abstract or Introduction. In some cases it’s possible to now make the original claims more concrete, e.g., by referring to quantitative performance results or by stating your observations and analyses.
Future Work describes the value of a paper by showing how the work sets new research directions.
References
G. Eason, B. Noble, and I. N. Sneddon, “On certain integrals of Lipschitz-Hankel type involving products of Bessel functions,” Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. London, vol. A247, pp. 529–551, April 1955. (references)
J. Clerk Maxwell, A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, 3rd ed., vol. 2. Oxford: Clarendon, 1892, pp.68–73.
I. S. Jacobs and C. P. Bean, “Fine particles, thin films and exchange anisotropy,” in Magnetism, vol. III, G. T. Rado and H. Suhl, Eds. New York: Academic, 1963, pp. 271–350.
K. Elissa, “Title of paper if known,” unpublished.
R. Nicole, “Title of paper with only first word capitalized,” J. Name Stand. Abbrev., in press.
Y. Yorozu, M. Hirano, K. Oka, and Y. Tagawa, “Electron spectroscopy studies on magneto-optical media and plastic substrate interface,” IEEE Transl. J. Magn. Japan, vol. 2, pp. 740–741, August 1987 [Digests 9th Annual Conf. Magnetics Japan, p. 301, 1982].
M. Young, The Technical Writer’s Handbook. Mill Valley, CA: University Science, 1989.

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